8 of the Highest Paying Jobs Even a Middle Schooler Could Handle

The stereotype of the eighth grader is that of a lonely, ambitious, assertive, yet insecure adolescent, struggling to find a balance between discovering an independent identity and trying to secure a place among a friend group that shares his or her interests and hobbies. Then he or she has to find their special place within that friend group, and the arduous process begins anew. Eighth grade is also a popular time for us to begin dating, and eighth graders often don’t have access to smart phones, unlimited internet data, and the professional photography services involved in maintaining a respectable online dating profile that so many of us adults (admit it!) enjoy to aid them in navigating this new social world. Needless to say, it’s a tough age, which is why it is so memorable for adults.

Still, this formative stage of life imparts academic and emotional lessons that are critical to surviving today’s job market. As an eighth grader, the goal is very often simply to make it to the ninth grade without developing severe agoraphobia, flunking out, or running out of people to date. These survivalist instincts require the honing of important social and practical skills, ranging from general (e.g. time management) to specific (e.g. statistics and acne-preventing skin care, to name a few). Many of these emotional and academic lessons learned in eighth grade can be parlayed into an impressive and marketable business profile, by those of us who survive it.

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8th grade 07

8. Avon (or other) Sales Representative

Average Yearly Income: $15,600-26,000 ($300-500 a week)

Eighth grade teaches you learn how to advocate for yourself and steer an advantageous course in a social setting on your own, without the aids of teaching assistants to walk you from class to class. This passing time can become very fruitful for those of us who are willing to promote ourselves (as prom queen, class president, hall monitor, or the like), or our merchandise (weed, parents’ alcohol, etc.). This experience is useful training for a career in independent sales, whether it be software, a commercial line of skincare products, or just more expensive drugs.